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World Rabies Day - Friday, September 28, 2012

Today, September 28th, is World Rabies Day! Make sure your furry friends are vaccinated against this deadly disease.

Today, September 28th, is World Rabies Day! Make sure your furry friends are vaccinated against this deadly disease. Here is some important information from the CDC about rabies prevention and awareness:

http://www.cdc.gov/Features/Rabies/

World Rabies Day is September 28. On this day, begin to take the steps to keep yourself and your family free from rabies. Look for events in your area that provide an opportunity to celebrate World Rabies Day and get the facts on rabies prevention and control.

Rabies is a deadly virus that can kill anyone who gets it. Every year, an estimated 40,000 people in the U.S. receive a series of shots known as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) due to potential exposure to rabies. In addition, the U.S. public health cost associated with rabies is more than $300 million a year. Each year around the world, rabies results in more than 55,000 deaths – approximately one death every 10 minutes. Most deaths are reported from Africa and Asia with almost 50% of the victims being children under the age of 15.

The Challenge of Rabies

Rabies is present on every inhabited continent. People usually get rabies when they are bitten by an animal that has the virus. In the U.S., the animals that most often get rabies are wild animals. Fortunately, the U.S. has been successful in eliminating a particular kind of rabies – known as canine rabies – that is responsible for rabies spreading from dog-to-dog.

However, canine rabies has not been controlled in many regions of the world, further threatening the health of humans and animals in these areas. In addition, some areas of the world have problems with large numbers of stray dogs, which can often come in contact with wild animals that have rabies. This often causes an increased number of rabid animals that have the potential to transmit the virus to humans.

The good news is that people can easily take steps to help prevent and control rabies.

Keep Away from Wildlife and Unfamiliar Animals

More than 90% of all animal rabies cases reported to CDC each year occur in wild animals. The main animals that get rabies include raccoons, bats, skunks and foxes.

One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to avoid contact with wild animals. Do not feed or handle them, even if they seem friendly.

Unfamiliar animals that are often thought of as pets, such as dogs and cats, should also be avoided. These animals are often in contact with wildlife and can also transmit rabies to humans.

If you see an animal acting strangely, report it to animal control. Some things to look for are:

  • General sickness
  • Problems swallowing
  • Lots of drool or saliva
  • An animal that appears more tame than you would expect
  • An animal that bites at everything
  • An animal that's having trouble moving or may even be paralyzed

Sometimes, people may come across a dead animal. Never pick up or touch dead animals. The rabies virus may still be present in the saliva or nervous tissue, especially if they have only been dead for a short time. If you see a dead animal, call animal control to take care of the animal's body.

Take Pets to a Veterinarian for Their Rabies Shot

No matter where you live, rabies can threaten your family's health. Fortunately, there are things you can do around the home to help reduce the risk of getting rabies.

  • Keep your pets indoors. When a dog goes outside, make sure an adult is there to watch it and keep it safe.
  • Do not feed or put water for your pets outside and keep garbage securely covered. These items may attract wild animals or stray animals to your yard.
  • Teach children never to handle wild animals or unfamiliar domestic animals.

While most wild animals are found primarily outdoors, bats can sometimes fly into buildings. This includes your home and even the room where you sleep. If you see a bat in your home, confine the bat to a room by closing all doors and windows leading out of the room except those to the outside. The bat will probably leave soon. If not, approach it slowly, and when it lands and place a box or coffee can over it. Slide a piece of cardboard under the container to trap the bat inside. Tape the cardboard to the container securely. Be sure to contact your health department or animal control authority so they can test the bat for rabies.

There are also steps you can take to "bat-proof" your home.

 

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

Dan October 23, 2012 at 02:54 AM
The one thing thats clear here: Sue, Betty & Jack have never posted any comments before doing so here on Rabies. So, I would guess they are people hiding behind fake accounts (Likely the same person given the tone of what was posted). It's sad people like you can only throw out negative comments about people instead of constructive dialog about an issue.
Ken S. November 02, 2012 at 05:48 PM
Dan you are wrong. Several weeks ago I read a womans limbs were amputated because her dog licked her. She had cancer and a depressed immune system. Pregnant woman can also lose their child from dog waste bacteria. Bacteria is toxic. Do a search on it and do a search on "Cat Lady Suicide." You will be amazed how serious this issue is.
Ken S. November 02, 2012 at 05:49 PM
Dan you are wrong. Several weeks ago I read a womans limbs were amputated because her dog licked her. She had cancer and a depressed immune system. Pregnant woman can also lose their child from dog waste bacteria. Bacteria is toxic. Do a search on it and do a search on "Cat Lady Suicide." You will be amazed how serious this issue is.
Dan November 06, 2012 at 03:37 AM
Nope, not possible.
Dan November 06, 2012 at 03:48 AM
Nope, not possible, unless someone has a cut or burn where any bacterial infection could enter. Urban legion with no truth of fact. Note: This person also has never posted anything other than in this one thread and has no background.

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